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Getting to know China’s ‘She-conomy’

'She-conomy': How women under 30 are shaping the future of brands in China

The rise of digital communication and the liberalisation of China’s media landscape have fundamentally changed how Chinese consumers access information and entertainment. But more importantly, it has brought about the emancipation of an entire generation of Chinese women.

China’s women under 30 are more empowered, more adventurous and more self-confident than any previous female generation. The flip-side of this personal development is that they are now more discerning and demanding of brands. As more and more women are making purchase and investment decisions, the Chinese market is slowly but surely turning into a ‘She-conomy’.

As more and more women are making purchase and investment decisions, the Chinese market is slowly but surely turning into a ‘She-conomy’. And in order to win in this new reality, brand owners will need to redefine their engagement strategies based on profound insights into this audience.

To better understand the drivers and desires of China’s women under 30, MediaCom has commissioned a comprehensive study into the different generational cohorts in China. China’s women under 30 are found in two cohorts, the ‘Leapers 2.0’ (22-30y) and the ‘Change Makers’ (21 and below).

China’s women under 30 are found in two cohorts, the ‘Leapers 2.0’ (22-30y) and the ‘Change Makers’ (21 and below)

Both of these cohorts grew up in a China that was growing in global recognition, quickly developing from the ‘world’s workbench’ to a leading player in the global economy. As a result, China’s women under 30 are the most globally-minded and at the same time display a profound pride in their country.

China’s women under 30 are found in two cohorts, the ‘Leapers 2.0’ (22-30y) and the ‘Change Makers’ (21 and below). Both of these cohorts grew up in a China that was growing in global recognition, quickly developing from the ‘world’s workbench’ to a leading player in the global economy. As a result, China’s women under 30 are the most globally-minded and at the same time display a profound pride in their country.

Today, these women play an increasingly important role in China’s future –contributing to the labour force and driving consumption. Over the last 30 years, changes to the laws regarding education and employment have meant big changes to women’s rights and status in China’s economy.

Find out more about China’s ‘She-conomy‘. Click here to read the full white paper.

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